Spring greens and pumpkin seed rye “sourdough”

Spring greens and pumpkin seed rye “sourdough”

By
From
Good Better Green
Makes
1 small pillow loaf

This is not strictly sourdough, but the long rising time gives the bread a complex, delicious sourdough taste and makes it a lot easier to digest. It seems cumbersome to make, as there are a few steps, but the eort is well worth it, especially if you crave a proper bread but don’t have a sourdough starter. You could always double the recipe and make two loaves, slicing and freezing one for later use. Serve with an omelette or a selection of cheeses and chutneys.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
300g spring greens, thick core and stalks removed, roughly chopped
450g rye flour, plus extra for dusting
1/4 teaspoon fast-action dried yeast
1 1/4 teaspoons fine sea salt
100g pumpkin seeds
2 teaspoons caraway seeds
400ml tepid water

Method

  1. Steam or sauté the greens in a little water until wilted. Drain and allow to cool, then very ­nely chop or process in a food processor.
  2. In a large bowl, combine the greens, „our, yeast, salt, and pumpkin and caraway seeds. Add the water and stir until blended. The dough will be shaggy and sticky. Cover the bowl with cling­lm and leave the dough to rest for at least 12 hours, but preferably about 18–20 hours, at warm room temperature. The dough is ready when it feels spongy when pressed with a ­nger. If you break it open slightly, you will see the threads that have developed.
  3. Scrape the dough out onto a lightly „oured work surface. Sprinkle it with a little more „our and fold it over on itself a couple of times. You should not have to get your hands dirty to do this. Cover loosely with the cling­lm and leave to rest for 15 minutes.
  4. Using just enough „our to keep the dough from sticking to the work surface or to your ­ngers, gently and quickly shape the dough into a ball. Again, you should use enough „our not to get your hands dirty.
  5. Place a large piece of cling­lm or a cotton tea towel on a tray and generously dust with „our. Place the dough on it seam side down, dust with more „our and cover with a second piece of cling­lm or towel. Leave to rise again, 3–4 hours, in a warm place. The dough should more than double in size and the surface should crack.
  6. At least 30 minutes before you are ready to bake the bread, preheat the oven to 230°C. Choose a lidded, heavybottomed (cast iron, enamel, Pyrex or ceramic) pot or dish that will neatly ­t the dough (about 20cm) and put the pot (without the lid) in the oven as it heats.
  7. When the dough is ready, carefully remove the hot pot from the oven. Slide your hand under the cling­lm under the dough and carefully turn the dough over into the pot. Be careful not to let dough fold over onto itself. It may look a little messy, but give the pot a shake to evenly distribute the dough.
  8. Cover with the lid and bake for 30 minutes, then lower the oven temperature to 180°C and bake for another 70 minutes, until beautifully brown, with a lovely crust. Turn out onto a wire rack and cool completely before cutting. It freezes well in slices and can be toasted from frozen.
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