Seafood

Seafood

By
Tony Chiodo
Contains
9 recipes
Published by
Hardie Grant Books
ISBN
9781740668873
Photographer
Chris Chen

Cooking with seafood can seem complicated – the fear of getting it wrong often stops people from buying some enticing fresh fish or prawns at the market. Memories of times tried and failed with seafood tend to stick in our mind.

As with anything though, the more often you cook with seafood, the easier the process becomes. The recipes in this chapter have been tried and tested many times by people who have attended my cooking classes over the years – so rest assured it is indeed possible to cook fish and seafood with ease.

Fish is a nutrient-packed food. It is a good quality source of protein and doesn’t contain the high saturated fats found in other meats. Fish, especially oily fish such as salmon, is a terrific source of omega-3 fatty acids, which are known to help lower blood pressure, assist the heart and improve cardiovascular function. So, not only does it taste terrific, fish also leaves you feeling well.

Here are some simple steps to help you learn to swim (and cook) with the fishes:

Buy fresh fish from a local market. Start a relationship with a fishmonger you trust and be led by their expert recommendations.

Try to follow a sustainable fish policy. Buy fish that are from local waters. Wild sea or river fish is preferred over farmed fish every time. Your friendly fishmonger can help you explore this.

Buying whole fish is almost a guarantee of its freshness – yet many people find this prospect too scary to tackle. Once fish has been filleted it’s much harder to assess its freshness. Some vendors claim snap-frozen fish as fresh fish, but for me any fish that has spent time in the freezer will definitely lose its joy when defrosting. Fresh fish shouldn’t be slimy – it should be uniformly firm to the touch and smell like a fresh and salty sea breeze.

Store fish at or below 4°C, well sealed in an airtight container. Ideally store the fish over some ice.

Serve fish with a lemon or lime wedge, some freshly grated ginger or some freshly grated daikon on the side as they will all help make fish more digestible.

Combine fish with raw salads or steamed or boiled greens for an easily digestible meal. Avoid combing fish with starchy grains for a cleaner, more balanced meal.

Recipes in this Chapter

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