Sauces, pickles and condiments

Sauces, pickles and condiments

By
Tony Chiodo
Contains
25 recipes
Published by
Hardie Grant Books
ISBN
9781740668873
Photographer
Chris Chen

Sauces

Sauces draw ingredients together and breathe freshness and life into a dish. They give meals their distinctive character and help support all the ingredients into becoming a happy, cohesive dish. We all know when a meal feels satisfying and most often it’s the sauce that makes it happen.

My repertoire includes three styles of sauces. Firstly there are the clear sauces, which are thickened with either kuzu or arrowroot, and used to glaze noodles. These dishes all look smooth and satin-like and taste fantastic with the clear glaze holding the ingredients and flavours together.

The second style is a puréed vegetable sauce, often made from slow-cooked sweet vegetables and then blended until creamy. Puréed pumpkin or carrot are then enriched with tahini or olive oil to make a satisfying sauce. Use over vegetables, with noodles or grains, or as a dip.

The third style of sauce is uncooked, and basically a dressing. Whisk together an oil and vinegar combination, or blend together some tahini and lemon juice. All dressings must have a fat component, such as olive oil, sesame oil or tahini, combined with something acidic such as vinegar or a citrus juice. Add sea salt and a herb like basil or chives, whisk and serve. Dressings keep well when sealed in a jar and refrigerated.

Sauces and dressings explode with excitement and taste when you use a combination of the following flavours: sour – lemon, lime, vinegar, yoghurt; bitter – olive oil, sesame oil, tahini, toasted sesame seeds; sweet – rice syrup, mirin, honey; pungent – ginger, garlic, horseradish, mustard; salty – miso, sea salt, shoyu, tamari.

Pickles

Pickles are often forgotten on the plate, pushed aside or hardly noticed. Natural pickles are nature’s way of delivering live enzymes into the gut to aid good digestion. Pickles set about restoring the intestinal flora by promoting the growth of healthy bacteria. So for some, pickles may be a bit of a miracle food, or at least a good pick-me-up, but beware, eat small amounts as pickles contain a fair amount of unrefined sea salt.

Most cultures boast about their own time-honoured method of making a particular pickle. Generally, pickles have evolved within cultures where they’ve needed to preserve foods for the whole year. The Japanese delight in a little pickle with their fried foods. The Germans munch on sauerkraut, the Polish enjoy pickled cucumber and the Italians have their giardiniere.

Pickles come in two styles: ‘quick to pickle’ or ‘long to pickle’.

Some quick pickle varieties are also called pressed salads. By combining crisp, firm vegetables with unrefined sea salt and adding some weight for up to an hour you will produce a simple pickle. The pressing action breaks down the cellulose in the vegetables making nutrients available. If your pickle turns out too salty, rinse the vegetables under cold running water, squeeze out the excess water and serve.

Condiments

Condiments are great for adding a little extra seasoning for those who need it with their meal. By combining unrefined sea salt with toasted seeds you add extra minerals to your dish. Beware – they’re addictive!

Featured Recipes in this Chapter

    No results found
    No more results
      No results found
      No more results
        No results found
        No more results
          No results found
          No more results
            No results found
            No more results
              No results found
              No more results
              Please start typing to begin your search
              We're sorry but we had trouble running your search. Please try again