Noodles and pasta

Noodles and pasta

By
Tony Chiodo
Contains
9 recipes
Published by
Hardie Grant Books
ISBN
9781740668873
Photographer
Chris Chen

Noodles and pasta are enjoyed by many people and cultures across the globe. The Chinese simmer their clear cellophane noodles in delicate broths, the Japanese slurp their saucy buckwheat noodles with abandon and the Italians gulp down copious amounts of spaghetti.

When combined with a bean sauce or a soy food, your noodle or pasta dish moves towards being a complete and satisfying meal.

Noodles and pasta come in many dazzling shapes and sizes and are made from a variety of different flours. Some are bought dry and others fresh. Pasta is often made from wheat flour, with added water and salt. Japanese-style noodles, by contrast, are made with a combination of flours, such as buckwheat or rice, and sometimes wheat flour. Chinese-style dried noodles are often made from rice starch or mung beans, while fresh noodles are often made with rice flour.

I prepare noodles and pasta two ways: by traditional method and by ‘shock’ method.

The traditional method is used for most pasta recipes that call for cooking al dente. To prepare pasta using this method, first bring a large saucepan of boiling water to a strong, rolling boil, remove the lid and add the pasta, stirring continuously so that it doesn’t stick together. Add a teaspoon of salt to enhance the flavour. To see if it’s done, take one strand and cut it. It should be firm and cooked right through, but not mushy.

I use the shock method for Japanese-style noodles, such as buckwheat and udon. These noodles are hardier, more wholesome, very flavoursome and can withstand extreme cooking conditions. To prepare noodles with this method, bring a large saucepan of water to the boil, drop in the noodles, stir them and quickly add a cup of cold water to ‘shock’ them. Repeat this method of ‘shocking’ up to three times and then check the noodle for doneness. The noodle is ready when cooked through but still firm. Refresh the noodles under cold running water if they are to be used later and add a teaspoon of sesame oil so they don’t stick together.

Over the years I’ve had fun experimenting with noodles and pasta and the following recipes are some of my favourites.

Recipes in this Chapter

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