Mini apple and chocolate charlottes

Mini apple and chocolate charlottes

By
From
The Natural Cook
Makes
6-8
Photographer
Laura Edwards

A very tempting little dessert. The chocolate soaks into the bread and becomes a little caramelised and crunchy. You will need a deep muffin tray.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
1 quantity Stewed apples with cinnamon and chocolate
60g butter, softened
50g light muscovado sugar
6-7 thin slices sourdough bread, crusts removed
or 6-7 thin slices wholemeal bread, crusts removed

Method

  1. Preheat the oven to 200°C. Mix the butter and sugar together and spread it on both sides of the slices of bread. Cut the bread to line the sides only of six to eight muffin moulds, sticking it on with the butter, overlapping it slightly and pressing together so the sides are sealed. Leave the bottoms of the moulds open. Cut out ‘tops’ (which when turned out will become bottoms) with the leftover bread.
  2. Fill each mould tightly with apples, then add the buttered bread ‘tops’ and press down firmly to seal with the bread sides. Bake in the hot oven for about 20 minutes, until the charlottes bubble and become a bit crispy on top.
  3. Be patient and allow to cool a bit. Run a knife around the edges and carefully prise each charlotte out of its mould with a spoon. If they fall apart, gently encourage them back together. The exposed apple at the top should look caramelised and inviting. Serve warm or cold with crème fraîche or yogurt.

Storage

  • The stewed apples will keep for four days in a sealed container in the fridge. The charlottes are best eaten immediately, but will keep in an airtight container for three days. Reheat them gently in a warm oven to crisp up once more before serving.

Cook natural

  • Apple peelings should be eaten and not thrown away or composted, for they contain most of the nutrients. Leave them on when cooking if you can, or keep the peelings with the cores in the freezer until you have a kilogram or more, to make a pectin-rich liquid to add to jams. Just put them in a pot, not quite covered with water, bring to the boil and simmer for 45 minutes. Allow to strain overnight through a jelly bag – or a tea towel or piece of muslin – into a bowl. Squeeze every last bit of the liquid out of the cloth. Use the liquid to set low-pectin fruit jam, such as plum, by adding an equal quantity to the fruit or juice, then following the jam recipe. Using this liquid pectin also allows you to make your preserve with raw cane sugar instead of highly processed and refined white sugar.
Tags:
The Natural Cook
Poco
Tom Hunt
sustainability
food cycle
vegetables
seasonal
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