Corn on the cob with bavette steak and chimichurri

Corn on the cob with bavette steak and chimichurri

By
From
The Natural Cook
Serves
4
Photographer
Laura Edwards

Chimichurri is an Argentinian condiment, similar to a vinegary salsa verde but with a touch of chilli. Traditionally it is served with beef, but it works really well with most things cooked on a barbecue.

For the corn and steak

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
1 quantity Barbecued sweetcorn, boiled but not yet char-grilled
800 g strip bavette steak
light olive oil

For the chimichurri

Quantity Ingredient
40g parsley, finely chopped
2 garlic cloves, crushed
pinch chilli flakes
8 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
3 tablespoons red wine vinegar
2 teaspoons dried oregano
or fresh sprigs oregano, chopped

Method

  1. Chimichurri gets better as it matures, so make it first (or, even better, the day before). Mix all the ingredients together and set aside for the flavours to mellow.
  2. Light the barbecue following the instructions given left. Season the steak with plenty of salt and pepper and rub it well with light olive oil.
  3. Barbecue the corn at the same time as the steak; this should give enough time to cook the steak and allow it to rest. Allow the steak to colour and slightly char on one side, then turn and char again. If you like your steak rare, remove it from the heat now and allow it to rest. If you like it medium, cook for a further minute each side then rest for a few minutes. If you like well-done steak, I’d recommend asking your butcher to butterfly the steak into a thin slice for quick cooking.
  4. Once rested, slice the bavette across the grain. Serve with the corn, smothering both in chimichurri.

Variation

  • Burrito: Excellent if you have leftover steak, barbecued sweetcorn and chimichurri. Boil 50 g brown rice per person. Cut the kernels from the cobs and slice the steak. Heat tortillas in a pan or on the barbecue, then fill with rice, steak, corn and a good helping of chimichurri. Wrap and enjoy.

Storage

  • Chimichurri will keep in a sealed container in the fridge for four days, as will both the cooked meat and the barbecued corn. Return everything to room temperature before serving, or turning into burritos.

Cook natural

  • When lighting a barbecue, make the most of it by going through the fridge to find any other vegetables that will be good grilled. Excellent candidates are past-their-best peppers or aubergines, artichokes, courgettes, fennel bulbs and leeks. Cook them up at the same time for a char-grilled vegetable feast. Keep leftovers in the fridge and dress with vinaigrette for a char-grilled vegetable salad.
Tags:
The Natural Cook
Poco
Tom Hunt
sustainability
food cycle
vegetables
seasonal
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