Japanese steak haché

Japanese steak haché

Hambagu

By
From
JapanEasy
Serves
4
Photographer
Laura Edwards

The steak haché, or hamburger steak, is something that’s long fallen out of fashion in Europe and America, but in Japan it’s still common at casual restaurants. There are even whole chains specialising in them, one of which has perhaps my favourite name of any restaurant anywhere: Bikkuri Donkey (translation: Surprise Donkey). The hamburger steak is thoroughly, undeniably lowbrow, it’s true, but it’s also very good, especially done the Japanese way – with a sweet dashi-soy sauce and tons of onions worked through the mince for moisture and flavour.

Not difficult

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
80g breadcrumbs
10-12 flat-leaf parsley sprigs, plus a few extra leaves, chopped, to garnish
1 large onions, roughly chopped
or 2 small onions, roughly chopped
2 garlic cloves, peeled
salt
freshly ground black pepper
600g beef mince, try to get a fairly coarse, fatty mince
200ml see method for ingredients
100ml dashi
2 tablespoons ketchup
1 tablespoon worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
4 eggs
4 slices gruyere, 100 g in total
100g crispy fried onions

Method

  1. Combine the breadcrumbs, parsley, onions, garlic and some salt and pepper in a food processor until a coarse paste is formed. Mix this into the beef mince and form into 4 patties.
  2. Combine the sweet soy sauce, dashi, ketchup and Worcestershire sauce in a saucepan and bring to the boil. Set a frying pan (skillet) or griddle over a very high heat and fry the beef patties in a little of the oil for about 3–5 minutes on each side, or longer for well done.
  3. Meanwhile, heat the remaining oil in a separate frying pan and fry the eggs. When the burgers are nearly done, pour over the sweet soy sauce mixture and top each with a slice of cheese. Place the burgers under a hot grill until the cheese melts and browns slightly, then remove and top each burger with a fried egg. Serve with the sauce poured on the side, sprinkled with the crispy fried onions. Add parsley to garnish. In Japan this is typically served with rice and a salad, but I like it with mash or chips.
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