Kebabs from Adana

Kebabs from Adana

Adana kebabı

By
From
Turkish Fire
Makes
8
Photographer
Alicia Taylor

Every Turkish region has its own version of the kebab, varying slightly according to what ingredients are locally available and in season, and thereby varying a little in taste. The kebabs from Adana, a city in the south-east of Turkey near the Syrian border, are very popular and can be found all throughout Turkey.

Adana kebabı can be eaten for lunch or dinner, and aren’t usually served with any other accompaniments.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
40g butter
1 tablespoon pul biber, (see note)
1kg minced sheep or lamb
2 white onions, peeled and grated
1 tablespoon turkish red pepper paste, (see note)
1/2 loaf Turkish breads, cut into strips
250g garlic yoghurt, (see note)
chopped flat-leaf parsley, for sprinkling

Method

  1. Melt the butter in a small saucepan over a gentle heat. Stir in the pul biber. Warm until fragrant, then set to one side.
  2. Put the meat, onion and pepper paste in a large bowl and season with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. Using your bare hands, mix together for at least 20 minutes.
  3. Meanwhile, if using wooden skewers, soak eight skewers in cold water for about 20 minutes so they don’t scorch on the barbecue.
  4. Roll the meat mixture into sausage shapes and spear onto your skewers.
  5. Meanwhile, fire up your barbecue or grill to high. Cook the kebabs on the barbecue grill bars or under the grill for 5–6 minutes, or until the meat is cooked to your liking. Remove from the heat and allow to rest for a few minutes.
  6. Meanwhile, take a heavy-based frying pan and dry-fry the bread strips on both sides until golden.
  7. Place the bread strips on a serving platter. Remove the meat from the skewers, directly onto the bread. Spoon the garlic yoghurt over, sprinkle with parsley, drizzle the spiced butter over everything and serve.

Note

  • Pul biber is a crushed red powder made from dried aleppo peppers. It is mild to medium in heat, and the Turkish love sprinkling it over just about anything. If you can’t find it in spice shops or Middle Eastern grocery stores, you can use chilli flakes instead.

Note

  • Turkish red pepper paste, or biber salcasi, is a thick, hot, spicy, dark red paste made from red capsicums and chillies. You’ll find it in Middle Eastern grocery stores.

Note

  • To make the garlic yoghurt, crush 2 peeled garlic cloves to a smooth paste using a mortar and pestle. Gently fold the garlic and 1 tablespoon sea salt through 500 g plain Greek-style yoghurt; don’t stir too vigorously as you don’t want the yoghurt to liquefy. Cover and refrigerate until required; the garlic yoghurt is best served cold, as it tends to get a little runny at room temperature.
Tags:
Turkish
Fire
Sevtap
Yuce
Turkey
European
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