Rice vermicelli and fish sauce

Rice vermicelli and fish sauce

Khao pun nam ya

By
From
South East Asian Food

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
2 tablespoons country fish paste water
2 teaspoons fish sauce
2 cups water
1 fish, about 600–800 g
or 500g fish fillets
2 cups good coconut milk
4 kaffir lime leaves
sugar, to taste (optional)
300g rice vermicelli
1/2 banana blossom, sliced
2 cups beansprouts, tailed and washed
250g snakebeans or stringless beans, sliced into small rounds
2-3 cabbage leaves, finely shredded
coriander leaves or mint sprigs, for garnish

Paste spices

Quantity Ingredient
5 large dried chillies, seeded, soaked in warm water until soft and then squeezed dry
1 stalk lemongrass, finely sliced
1 thick slice galangal, chopped
2-3 garlic cloves, peeled and chopped
10 shallots, peeled and chopped

Method

  1. In a mortar or a food processor attachment pound the chillies, lemongrass, galangal, garlic and shallots – in the order listed – to a fine paste. Mix the country fish paste water, fish sauce and 2 cups water in a saucepan, heat and add the fish. When the fish is cooked, remove it from the stock. Bone and flake it, then pound it to a fine paste. Keep the stock aside.
  2. Put 1 cup coconut milk into a saucepan and boil it, stirring all the time until the water has reduced and the oil has come out. Put in the spice paste and stir-fry it in the coconut milk until it smells cooked, then add the fish, stir well and fry some more. Now add the stock in which the fish has cooked, the lime leaves and sugar. Taste and adjust the seasoning then pour in enough of the remaining coconut milk to give a good flavour and consistency. Turn down the heat and cook uncovered a little longer. Meanwhile cook the vermicelli and twirl it into a number of separate rounds if you can. Arrange these on a plate and the vegetables on another one. Pour the sauce into a bowl. Diners put a vermicelli round in their bowl together with a selection of vegetables then ladle the sauce over everything, garnishing with some coriander leaves or mint sprigs.
  3. Khao pun nam ya should be thickish. A version of the same dish using shrimp paste instead of country fish paste and known there as khanom jin nam ya is popular in Thailand.
Tags:
SBS
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