Tamarind pulp

Tamarind pulp

By
From
Spice Kitchen
Makes
250 ml
Photographer
Jana Liebenstein

Tamarind is a popular souring agent used in Indian cooking. In North India it is usually combined with something sweet, such as jaggery (dark brown unrefined sugar), molasses or sugar, to provide a sweet and sour flavour in dishes. In the west and south it is normally used in fish and vegetable preparations to add an intensely sour flavour. Tamarind is available in dried seedless form, as a concentrate or already pulped in refrigerated tubs. I prefer the dried tamarind that can be reconstituted into a pulp (as described here) when required, rather than the concentrate, which has an overly strong colour and flavour, or the ready-made pulp, which is perishable.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
100g dried tamarind

Method

  1. Heat the dried tamarind and 250 ml water in a small saucepan over a medium heat, stirring occasionally, for about 3–5 minutes, or until the tamarind is softened and disintegrating. Strain through a mesh strainer into a bowl to obtain a smooth pulp. It will keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.
Tags:
restaurant
Indian
India
Asia
Asian
Spice Kitchen
Ragini
Dey
restaurant
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