Making yoghurt at home

Making yoghurt at home

By
From
A la Grecque
Makes
2 litres
Photographer
Mark Roper

I far prefer to make yoghurt from sheep’s milk. It has a higher fat content than cow’s milk, so it is thick and creamy – and, of course, very fattening! In Greece sheep’s milk is readily available as many people keep sheep for both milk and meat and most village women make their own yoghurt and cheese. Here in Australia you may find it difficult to source sheep’s milk, unless you breed your own sheep for milking or know a farmer who does. However, it is still worth making your own yoghurt with cow’s milk.

There are a number of very good yoghurts available commercially these days, but somehow home-made yoghurt is much nicer; mainly because it is less acidic and has a lighter, more delicate texture.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
2 litres fresh sheep’s milk
1 tablespoon sheep’s milk yoghurt, either purchased or kept from a previous homemade batch

Method

  1. Strain the milk through a muslin cloth to remove any impurities. Bring the milk to a boil in a large heavy-based saucepan. Then lower the heat to medium and simmer for at least 5 minutes. Pour the boiling milk into a large glass bowl and leave it to cool.
  2. This is the critical part. The natural bacteria will only work within a range of 32ºC–49ºC; any cooler and they won’t start to grow, any hotter and they will be destroyed. If you don’t have a thermometer, then allow the milk to cool until you can hold your finger in the milk comfortably for 11 seconds, without it scalding you.
  3. Put the yoghurt starter in a small bowl, then add a few tablespoons of the warm milk and stir until smooth. Pour it back into the warm milk and stir it in quickly so the milk doesn’t cool too much more. Cover the bowl with a lid (a large plate or a tray will do), and wrap it up in an old woollen blanket. Leave it in a warm place for 3½ hours without disturbing. On a hot day, check the bowl after 3 hours to see if the yoghurt has set. On a cold day it may need more time. Don’t leave it for too long or it will lose some of its sweetness and become a little sour.
  4. Transfer the set yoghurt to the fridge where it will keep for up to 2 weeks. Use a spoonful as a starter to make a new batch.
Tags:
Greek
Greece
European
Mediterranean
SBS
Grecque
Grecque
Pam
Talimanidis
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