Steak and kidney pudding

Steak and kidney pudding

By
From
Nathan Outlaw's Home Kitchen
Serves
4
Photographer
David Loftus

Quite simply, steak and kidney pudding is one of the all-time best British recipes. You can use any type of kidney but ox kidney is my preference.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient

For the pastry

Quantity Ingredient
275g plain flour
3 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon english mustard powder
1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
100g suet, chopped
200ml cold water

For the filling

Quantity Ingredient
oil, for cooking, plus extra to oil the basin
2 red onions, peeled and chopped
2 carrots, peeled and diced
2 tablespoon plain flour
500g chuck steak, cut into chunks
200g ox kidney, cut into chunks
500ml beer (i use sharp's doom bar)
2 bay leaves
sea salt
freshly ground black pepper

Method

  1. For the filling, heat a large flameproof casserole or pan over a medium heat and add a good drizzle of oil. When the oil is hot, add the onions and carrots and cook until softened and caramelised. Remove and set aside.
  2. Season the flour with salt and pepper. Toss the steak and kidney in the flour to coat, shaking off any excess. Heat up the casserole again, add a little more oil and brown the meat in small batches on all sides, then remove and set aside.
  3. Deglaze the casserole with the beer, scraping up any meaty bits from the bottom of the pan. Return the meat and vegetables to the pan and add the bay leaves. Simmer gently over a low heat for 2 hours until the meat is tender. Check the seasoning and leave to cool completely.
  4. Meanwhile, make the suet pastry (it is best made a few hours before assembling). Put the flour, baking powder, mustard powder and salt into a large bowl and rub in the suet, using your fingertips. Using a table knife, mix in enough cold water to bring the mix together to make a firm dough.
  5. Take a quarter of the dough, wrap it in cling film and set aside. Lightly oil a 1 litre pudding basin and line with 2 layers of cling film. Roll out the rest of the dough to the thickness of a £1 coin and use to line the basin, without stretching it. Spoon in the filling to 2cm from the rim. Roll out the other piece of dough and position over the filling, dampening the edges with cold water and pressing them together to seal.
  6. Cover with a round of baking parchment, pleated in the centre, and then a pleated round of foil. Secure under the rim of the basin with kitchen string, leaving a length of string to use as a handle. Pour enough water into a saucepan (large enough to take the pudding basin) to one-quarter fill it and bring to a simmer. Lower the basin into the pan, cover with a tight-fitting lid and simmer gently for 1½ hours, checking the water level every so often and topping up as necessary.
  7. When the pudding is ready, remove the foil and paper, then turn out onto a warmed plate and bring to the table. I like to serve it with mash, peas and horseradish sauce.
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