Sprouted buckwheat bread with vegetable kraut and goat’s curd

Sprouted buckwheat bread with vegetable kraut and goat’s curd

By
From
Real Food by Mike
Serves
4
Photographer
Alan Benson

Living in Australia has changed my breakfast habits, due both to the climate and the Aussie emphasis on healthy living. My wife, Joss, is very passionate about living food and wholefoods, and has heavily influenced the way I eat and the food I serve. This is a nice light breakfast to eat before the tyranny of the kids’ early morning Saturday sport begins, but it’s equally perfect as a Sunday brunch item. It’s also cracking with a poached egg.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
4 slices sprouted buckwheat sourdough
180g goat's curd or a very young goat cheese
280g vegetable kraut
20g alfalfa sprouts
1/4 bunch mint, leaves picked
40ml argan oil

Method

  1. Toast the bread and smear it with the goat’s curd.
  2. Combine the vegetable kraut, alfalfa sprouts and mint in a bowl to make a little salad and dress it with half the argan oil.
  3. Place a pile of salad on each slice of toast, drizzle with a little extra argan oil and a good grinding of black pepper and serve.

Note

  • Be certain to look for edible argan oil in a health food store, as many cosmetic companies use argan oil but often add other inedible ingredients.

Medicinal Benefit

  • Buckwheat contains amino acids, the building blocks of the protein that builds muscle tissue and gives muscle strength. It’s also high in rutin, a flavonoid which helps thin the blood and improve circulation. The assorted seeds add plant-based omega-3 fats, zinc to support the immune system, and magnesium for regulating blood pressure. Cabbage is full of essential vitamin C for boosting the immune system, and vitamin K for activating the proteins and calcium essential for blood clotting. It also contains potassium, which balances fluids in the body and helps maintain steady muscle contractions and nerve impulses. It’s thought that a diet high in potassium may lower blood pressure. Lacto-fermented vegetables contain beneficial Lactobacillus bacteria – more than occur in live yoghurt. Its benefits are:

    • It increases healthy flora in the intestinal tract

    • It lines the intestinal wall with friendly bacterial flora, which prevents yeast, and other pathogenic organisms overgrowing

    • It boosts the immune system

    • It detoxifies and cleans the colon and helps with constipation

    • It helps balance the pH (acidity/alkalinity) of the intestinal tract. (This is important, as eating too many acidic foods can lead to too much acid in the blood, causing bone thinning and inflammation.)
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