Carpaccio of squab, buckwheat praline and sherry vinaigrette

Carpaccio of squab, buckwheat praline and sherry vinaigrette

By
From
Marque
Serves
10
Photographer
Stuart Scott

According to Arrigo Cipriani, the owner of Harry’s Bar in Venice, carpaccio was invented at Harry’s Bar in 1950. The dish was named by Giuseppe Cipriani, in reference to the Venetian painter Vittore Carpaccio, as the red colour of the dish reminded him of paintings by Carpaccio. Since then there have been countless versions and it has become one of the standards of bad Italian restaurants all over the world. I never hesitated in using the name.

Ingredients

Method

  1. To make the buckwheat praline, bring 1 litre water to the boil and add 100 grams buckwheat. Simmer for about 1 to 1½ hours until completely soft , then strain, rinse and pat dry. Place the buckwheat on dehydrator trays and dry in a food dehydrator at 60°C for 6 to 8 hours, or until completely dried. Heat 2 centimetres canola oil to 220°C in a frying pan. Add the buckwheat one spoonful at a time and fry until golden. Drain on paper towels and repeat with the rest of the buckwheat. Dust the buckwheat with icing sugar. Toss in a hot pan to caramelise. Allow to cool. Store in an airtight container until required.
  2. Wash and peel 10 golf ball-sized turnips, then cut the tops and bottoms off them. Melt 200 grams duck fat in a saucepan. Add 2 crushed garlic cloves, 1 fresh bay leaf and 2 thyme sprigs. Lay the turnips on top of the aromatics. Cover with a cartouche, then slowly simmer the turnips for 1½ hours, or until tender. Strain off the fat and allow the turnips to cool down. Cut the turnips into 5 millimetre thick slices on a mandolin, then use a 3 centimetre pastry cutter to create discs of turnip.
  3. Use a cook’s blowtorch to scorch any remaining feathers from 5 size four squabs, then use the blowtorch to dry the skin covering the breasts. Break down the birds, leaving the breasts on the crown, but remove the wishbones. Cut the legs and remainder of the carcasses into small pieces and reserve. To make the brine, mix together 120 grams table salt, 60 grams brown sugar and 1 litre water until the salt and sugar dissolve. Soak the crowns in the brine for 1 hour.
  4. Remove the crowns from the brine and rinse thoroughly under running water to remove the excess brine. Pat dry. Steam them, uncovered, in a combi steam oven at 59°C for 45 minutes.
  5. To make the sherry vinaigrette, brown the reserved squab pieces in a large pan with a little olive oil for 25 minutes, or until golden. Cut ½ brown onion, 1 small carrot and ½ celery stalk into 1 centimetre dice and crush 2 garlic cloves. Add the vegetables to the pan and brown until caramelised. Add 2 diced tomatoes, 10 black peppercorns, 3 pieces of star anise, 3 thyme sprigs and 1 fresh bay leaf and cook until the tomatoes have collapsed, then add 250 millilitres port and let reduce until dry. Add enough chicken stock to cover the bones and simmer, skimming occasionally, for 4 hours.
  6. Strain through a chinoise, then return the liquid to a clean pan and reduce until viscous. Season the stock with well-aged sherry vinegar and split it with 1 tablespoon cold-pressed hazelnut oil. Finely slice 1 bunch chives and brunoise 1 small shallot. Mix the shallot and the chives through the vinaigrette just prior to serving.
  7. Pan-fry the squab breasts on the bone in a medium–hot frying pan with oil until golden. Allow to rest. Remove the breasts from the bone and lay on the workbench. Slice horizontally so you get several large thin slices from each breast. Warm the turnip discs in a little clarified butter.
  8. Put the buckwheat into a frying pan over a moderate heat and toss until the sugar caramelises.
  9. To serve, place a few turnip discs on each serving plate and brush with a little of the sherry vinaigrette. Add a few slices of the squab breast neatly around the plate. Sprinkle the buckwheat praline on top and around the breasts and drizzle the vinaigrette on and around the squab. Give a good grind of sichuan pepper and a sprinkle of Murray River pink salt.
Tags:
Marque
Mark
Best
Pei
Modern
restaurant
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high
end
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