Grass-fed wagyu bavette with soubise, black tea and stem salad

Grass-fed wagyu bavette with soubise, black tea and stem salad

By
From
Marque
Serves
10
Photographer
Stuart Scott

The Wagyu breed has been bred intensively in Australia for some years now. It is mainly famous for the extremely high fat content, being grain-fed in feedlots. I find the flavour to be quite boring with a taste almost of popcorn. For a true meat flavour we turn to the grass-fed free-range version of the same breed. We use a traditional butcher’s cut: the bavette or flank.

Ingredients

Method

  1. Begin this recipe one day in advance. To make the puffed black rice cracker powder, combine 300 grams jasmine rice, 1 litre water, 1 tablespoon squid ink and 1 teaspoon Murray River pink salt in a large saucepan. Cover with the lid and bring to a simmer. Cook over a low heat for about 40 minutes. Transfer the rice to a blender and purée until smooth. Line dehydrator trays with baking paper. Evenly spread the mixture on the dehydrator trays and dry in a food dehydrator at 50°C for 12 hours, or until dried and crisp and you have rice ‘paper’.
  2. Heat 1 litre vegetable oil in a flat rondeau to 200°C. Break the rice paper into manageable pieces and deep-fry until puff ed and crisp. Drain on paper towels and allow to cool. Transfer to a blender and blend until pulverised to a coarse powder. Season with Murray River pink salt and freshly ground black pepper. Store in an airtight container until required.
  3. Trim away any sinew from 1.5 kilograms Wagyu bavette, then cut into ten 150 gram portions. Season with Murray River pink salt and freshly ground black pepper. Seal each portion in separate sous-vide bags with 30 millilitres olive oil per bag and compress with moderate pressure. Refrigerate until required.
  4. To make the onion purée, finely slice 1 kilogram brown onions and add them to a flat rondeau with 25 grams butter. To make the tea, infuse 25 grams Tsar Alexander tea (or equivalent smoked black tea) in 250 millilitres hot water for 4 minutes. Strain the tea and add to the onions. Braise slowly for 2 hours under a cartouche. Continue to cook the onions until there is almost no liquid left , being careful not to let the onions catch on the base of the pan. Add 1 tablespoon squid ink and season with Murray River pink salt and freshly ground black pepper.
  5. Blend the onion mixture in a high-speed blender with 100 grams butter. Pass through a fine drum sieve. Reserve until required.
  6. To make the stem salad, remove the stems from 1 bunch Chinese broccoli and 1 bunch broccolini and peel them, reserving the broccolini tips. Cut the stems into small strips and set aside. Remove the stems from 1 bunch sorrel, cut into long strips and refresh in iced water, reserving the sorrel leaves.
  7. To make the sorrel purée, blend together the reserved sorrel leaves, 1 bunch English spinach and 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard. With the blender running, slowly add 50 millilitres olive oil. Pass the purée through a chinoise. Reserve until required.
  8. Preheat the oven to 200°C and line a baking tray with baking paper. To make the burnt leek and liquorice ash, trim away the dark green outer leaves of 4 large leeks. Thoroughly wash the white and pale green leaves. Place the leaves on the baking tray and bake for about 1 hour, or until they are completely blackened and dry. Allow to cool. The liquorice flavour is in the form of Turkish peppers (Tyrkisk Peber), a salty and hot Danish liquorice that uses ammonium chloride for its flavour. Blend the burnt leek with 4 Turkish peppers in a spice grinder until pulverised to a powder. Store in an airtight container until required.
  9. Cook the bavette in a water bath at 60°C for 25 minutes. Remove the bavette from the bags and season with Murray River pink salt and freshly ground black pepper. Sear each à la plancha to caramelise. Allow to rest before serving. Carve across the grain.
  10. Before serving, sauté the broccoli and broccolini stems in 50 grams butter and add a pinch of Murray River pink salt. Warm the onion purée and sorrel purée in separate small saucepans.
  11. To serve, place 1 tablespoon of the sorrel purée and the onion purée on each plate, add the carved beef, the rice powder, sautéed stems, sorrel stems and a dusting of the burnt leek and liquorice ash.
Tags:
Marque
Mark
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Pei
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