Tuna

Tuna

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From
Encyclopedia of Food and Cookery

Fresh tuna steaks are such a good food and comparatively economical with little wastage from such dense meat. Steaks cut from the middle sections of the fish are really delicious grilled (broiled). Fresh tuna can also be baked, pan-fried, sliced paper-thin for tuna carpaccio (see Carpaccio) or eaten raw in the Japanese dish Sashimi.

Tinned tuna is sold tinned in oil, springwater or brine, in solid-pack style (large pieces), chunk style (smaller pieces) and sandwich or salad style (flaked). Various manufacturers also tin it with flavourings, and it is one of the best items to have on the emergency shelf. A tin or two of tuna can be turned quickly into appetisers to serve with drinks, a hearty soup, a first course or main dish or, of course, into substantial salads and sandwiches. To cook: Fresh tuna is often marinated before cooking and must be well basted while grilling (broiling) or baking. For grilling, baking or poaching use steaks about 4 cm thick; for pan-frying use thinner ones, about 2 cm thick, or slice the tuna thinly into escalopes, flour lightly and fry for 2–3 minutes on each side. In general, it is best to leave the skin on the steaks for cooking, to hold them in shape, but peel it off before serving as it is unattractively dark and can have a strong flavour. Do not overcook tuna; the centre of each steak should be pale pink.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
see method for ingredients

Method

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