Sorrel

Sorrel

By
From
Encyclopedia of Food and Cookery

This plant is sometimes considered to be a herb, sometimes a vegetable. In appearance it is rather like English spinach but its flavour is lemony and fairly sharp, even bitter, although not unpleasant. It is because of its strong flavour that it is often used sparingly, like a herb.

Sorrel is a spring and summer plant, very easy to grow – the leaves should be picked often and while they are young and fresh. They may be added to other greens in a salad, or cooked like spinach and finished with cream or butter. In France, a handful of sorrel is often added to spinach; in this way, the sharpness of its taste is offset by the mild flavour of the spinach.

Cooked, squeezed dry and puréed, sorrel can be combined with fresh cheese and hard-boiled egg yolks, to refill the egg whites. Delicious soups are also made with sorrel and other greens, or with potato, cooked in chicken stock and finished with cream. A hot purée of sorrel, with or without spinach, goes well with pork or veal, and sorrel makes a classic accompaniment to salmon – indeed, it goes well with any fish.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
see method for ingredients

Method

Tags:
Back to top
    No results found
    No more results
      No results found
      No more results
        No results found
        No more results
          No results found
          No more results
            No results found
            No more results
              No results found
              No more results
              Please start typing to begin your search
              We're sorry but we had trouble running your search. Please try again