Sashimi

Sashimi

By
From
Encyclopedia of Food and Cookery
Serves
6

A highly regarded Japanese dish, consisting of slices of raw fish garnished with slivers of cabbage, white radish or other vegetables, and always accompanied by wasabi, a hot, green horseradish paste, and soy sauce for dipping. The fish selected for sashimi must be very fresh, ideally caught and eaten on the same day. The most prized fish is the tuna from the Northern Pacific.

The fish can be prepared either cut in small, square slabs with 5 or 6 pieces arranged resting on each other for one serving, or it can be sliced transparently thin.

Sashimi is nearly always served at a formal meal and is considered a course on its own.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
750g very fresh tuna, bream, kingfish, mackerel or mulloway
400g daikon, shredded
1 carrot, finely grated
6 spring onions, shredded
6 snow peas
6 king prawns, cooked
1 tablespoon wasabi
6 lemon wedges
1 tablespoon fresh ginger, grated
shoyu

Method

  1. Fillet fish, removing all skin and bones, and cut into thin slices. Arrange daikon, carrot and spring onions in mounds on a serving platter, together with snow peas. Arrange fish and prawns in centre of platter.
  2. Mix wasabi to a thick paste with a little water and place on platter, with lemon wedges and ginger.
  3. To serve, pour shoyu into individual bowls, then allow each diner to add wasabi and ginger to their own bowl of shoyu according to taste. The fish and vegetables are then dipped into this sauce before eating.

Note

  • Daikon is a giant white radish. Both daikon and wasabi are available from Asian greengrocers.
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