Sage

Sage

By
From
Encyclopedia of Food and Cookery

An easily grown perennial herb with a strong, pungent and slightly bitter flavour. The leaves may be dried, but for best flavour use young, fresh leaves. Always use sage sparingly; too much can completely overpower a dish.

Sage is common in both English and European cuisine. In Britain it is used as a flavouring in stuffings, especially the traditional sage and onion stuffing for roast duck. It is also one of the components of mixed herbs, and it is used to flavour cheese (for example sage derby) and special breads. Although in French cooking sage is not as widely used as thyme or rosemary, it is often used to flavour a roast of pork in Provence; Italian cooks combine sage with veal, as in saltimbocca, and in veal chops with sage and white wine.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
see method for ingredients

Method

Tags:
Back to top
    No results found
    No more results
      No results found
      No more results
        No results found
        No more results
          No results found
          No more results
            No results found
            No more results
              No results found
              No more results
              Please start typing to begin your search
              We're sorry but we had trouble running your search. Please try again