Prosciutto

Prosciutto

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From
Encyclopedia of Food and Cookery

The general Italian term for ham, although it has come to refer more particularly to raw, uncooked ham (prosciutto crudo).

Prosciutto is made throughout Italy, but the prosciutto of Parma has the highest reputation. It is traditionally prepared in the cold months of the year; prosciutto is cut from the hind thigh of the pig, salted, then dried for about 12–18 months.

A good prosciutto should be a deep, rosy pink colour, with a thin edge of white fat; it should be quite firm and dry. It is usually cut in paper-thin slices, since it contains very little moisture and its flavour is quite intense. It is often served as an antipasti or hors d’oeuvre, either by itself or accompanied by fresh ripe figs or melon. It may also be used with pasta, in which case thicker slices are required.

See also Ham.

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