Pâté and terrine

Pâté and terrine

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From
Encyclopedia of Food and Cookery

Pâté and terrine are standard features in any French charcuterie, and the basis of many a lunch for those who have travelled in that country.

It is difficult to make a firm distinction between a pâté and a terrine. A fine-textured liver pâté is almost always called a pâté, yet a coarse, meaty product might be called either a pâté de campagne or a terrine maison.

Originally, a pâté was always enclosed in pastry, and was made with almost any sort of meat or fish. Later, it came to be baked in an earthenware dish (a terrine), which was lined with thinly sliced pork fat to keep the mixture moist.

Most pâtés and terrines contain a good proportion of pork, especially fat belly pork. When making a pâté or terrine, if possible choose particular cuts of meat and either mince (grind) it yourself or have it minced by the butcher, rather than buying ready-minced meat. Fat is essential to the texture of the pâté or terrine, and enables it to be sliced without crumbling. It also means that a pâté or terrine is served without butter, and with just crusty French bread or a good wholemeal (whole-wheat) bread, plus some pickled gherkins or olives or a crisp salad.

A pâté or terrine is sometimes served as a first course; in this case, it is usually accompanied by thin, crisp Melba Toast or warm, freshly made toast or a selection of savoury crackers.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
see method for ingredients

Method

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