Orange

Orange

By
From
Encyclopedia of Food and Cookery

A golden citrus fruit available all year round. We depend on its refreshing, unique flavour and texture not only as a fresh fruit but also for use in cooking many savoury and sweet dishes.

Orange juice starts the day for many people and fresh squeezed orange juice retains its precious vitamin C. What better snack is there than a navel orange, peeled, divided into segments and eaten just as it is? Or try a bite of fresh fruit and then a mouthful of steaming hot, black coffee as is the way enjoyed by many people in Mediterranean countries.

Valencia oranges have thinner and smoother skins than navels. They are sweet, full of juice and available from October through to April. Navels then come in season, lasting from May through to September.

Bitter oranges, also known as Seville or bigarade, are not as easily available. They are too bitter to eat fresh but make excellent marmalade and are used in the classic Sauce Bigarade.

Choose oranges with bright shiny skins and no bruising or very soft spots. They should be firm and quite heavy to hold.

To serve whole: Slit the outer skin into 8 segments, cutting from the stem end to base. Carefully peel the skin away from the orange, leaving the skin attached to the base of the fruit. Tuck the skin points underneath the orange. To segment: Using a sharp knife, remove all the peel and pith then cut each side of each membrane to release segments.

To cut shells: Halve fruit and remove pulp, leaving the shell. Pulp may be chopped and mixed with other fruit before piling back into the shell. If you wish to have a scalloped edge, halve the fruit by cutting diagonal slits into the centre of the fruit. Carefully separate the halves and remove the pulp.

To grate zest: Rub the rind in short light strokes across a grater. Do not grate any of the bitter white pith.

To make orange peel strips: Peel strips of rind from one orange using a vegetable peeler. Do not include any bitter white pith. Cut the peel into fine matchstick lengths and cook gently in 125 ml water and 1 tablespoon sugar for about 5 minutes or until the rind becomes clear. Use to decorate hot or cold puddings, iced desserts, cakes or as specified in a recipe.

Ways to use oranges:

Squeeze orange juice over strawberries.

Add grated orange zest to stewed rhubarb.

Top pineapple rings with a thick orange slice, drizzle warm honey over and serve with yoghurt.

Cook rice in half orange juice and half water, add chopped mint to the cooked rice and serve with lamb, or add chopped thyme to orange rice and serve with veal or poultry.

Add grated orange zest to hot, buttery mashed potatoes and serve with fish or veal.

Orange Butter: Mash 125 g unsalted butter with 1 tablespoon orange juice and 1 tablespoon orange zest. Spread on sweet breads, or buns, scones or pikelets.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
see method for ingredients

Method

Tags:
Back to top
    No results found
    No more results
      No results found
      No more results
        No results found
        No more results
          No results found
          No more results
            No results found
            No more results
              No results found
              No more results
              Please start typing to begin your search
              We're sorry but we had trouble running your search. Please try again