Molasses

Molasses

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From
Encyclopedia of Food and Cookery

A dark heavy syrup which is a by-product of the various boiling-down processes used to produce sugar from sugar cane. There are three main types: light un-sulphured molasses, which is the syrup separated from young sugar canes; dark, sulphured molasses, a direct by-product of sugar manufacture (sulphur fumes are used in the making of sugar; hence the presence of sulphur in molasses); and blackstrap molasses, a dark, bitter syrup which is the residue of a third boiling process to extract most sugar crystals.

Light molasses, although used in cooking, is more often served over waffles, pancakes, muffins or ice cream as a table syrup. Dark molasses is used as an ingredient in recipes, while blackstrap molasses is a popular health food as well as being an additive used in cattle food, and in industry.

Sorghum molasses, as the name implies, is made from the seeds of sorghum grass native to tropical Africa and Asia. The syrup is thinner and more sour than cane molasses.

Molasses is used in making some of the great traditional dishes of the USA such as Boston Baked Beans and Indian Pudding (p. 389) from New England. It also makes a delicious sauce for pancakes, and an unusual spicy barbecue sauce that’s excellent with barbecued pork spare ribs. Molasses will keep after opening for up to 2 months if tightly covered in the refrigerator. You can buy molasses in jars at some supermarkets or health food shops.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
see method for ingredients

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