Mango ice cream

Mango ice cream

By
From
Encyclopedia of Food and Cookery

This exotic fruit, with its heady perfume, is now cultivated in many tropical countries. As mangoes do not travel well they are often picked green. Allow the fruit to ripen to a rosy orange-yellow to enjoy its unrivalled flavour, likened to a blend of ripe melon, mixed with peach and the tang of apricots. The choicest fruit should have a firm flesh and smooth texture free of any fibres.

Mango slices are put into curries, made into pickles with salt, oil and chillies, made into chutneys and desserts, or can be dried to make amchur powder, an important ingredient in some curries.

It should be neatly skinned, sliced off the stone, laid in small smooth portions and is best served a little chilled. Alternatively, each side is cut off the stone, turned flesh side up and scored into diamonds or cubes without cutting through the skin. A little pressure on the underside of the skin and the flesh opens like an flower ready for eating.

Mangoes are also available tinned in slices or as a pulp, also as a nectar or as chutney.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
see method for ingredients

Method

  1. To a litre of softened vanilla ice cream add 540 g ripe mango pulp. Mix well and freeze again.
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