Hare

Hare

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From
Encyclopedia of Food and Cookery

Hare is akin to rabbit in flavour, although it is darker and more gamey. Young hare (up to 1 year old) is called ‘leveret’; it may be roasted whole, or with fore and hind legs removed (saddle of hare), or forelegs only removed (baron of hare). It is often first marinated for a day or so before cooking as it tends to be dry, and is then roasted in the same way as rabbit. However, if there is any doubt about tenderness, hare is best casseroled or used for a pie.

The most famous hare dish, Jugged Hare (immortalised by Mrs Beeton with the purported advice ‘first you must catch your hare’), used to be made by putting hare pieces, vegetables, herbs and port into a pot or jug and standing it in boiling water to cook. It was then thickened with the hare’s blood. Nowadays it is more usual to braise the hare and to thicken the sauce with beurre manié.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
see method for ingredients

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