Escalope

Escalope

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Encyclopedia of Food and Cookery

Escalope is a French word which may mean any thin, boneless and skinless slice of meat or fish, but it is mainly used for fine slices of veal, beaten thin. The same delicate slices feature in the cuisines of various countries and take different names accordingly. The French escalope becomes scaloppine (plural, scaloppine) or sometimes costolette (cutlet) in Italian; the German name is schnitzel; in English, it is a scallop or simply a veal steak. You may find it under any of these names in butchers’ shops. Classically, escalopes are cut from the top of the leg, across the grain. Thin veal steaks from other sections are often sold as escalopes, schnitzels, etc., and they may also be satisfactory. Basic preparation: If you buy large veal steaks which separate into natural divisions, divide them. Snip around the edges so that escalopes will cook without curling. If not already beaten out, place each one between 2 sheets of baking paper and beat gently with a cutlet bat, rolling pin or the flat side of a meat mallet (not the knobbly side, which would tear the meat) to a thickness of 5 mm.

Tiny escalopines (Italian piccati) can be prepared at home from a loin or set of rib cutlets. Cut the eye of meat from the bone and slice across about 2 cm thick. Beat each slice out as described.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
see method for ingredients

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