Old-fashioned fish chowder

Old-fashioned fish chowder

By
From
Encyclopedia of Food and Cookery
Serves
6

A thick fish or seafood soup to which salt pork or bacon and diced vegetables are added, cream or milk making up part of the stock. It takes its name from the French word for pot or cauldron, chaudière, but is now more associated with New England and Newfoundland. Manhattan clam chowder and New England clam chowder vie with each other for popularity in the US.

This recipe may also be made with smoked fish. Poach the fish to remove excess salt, then flake and use as for fresh fish.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
125g pork, diced
or 4 rashers bacon, rind removed, diced
2 onions, finely sliced
3 potatoes, diced
2 tablespoons plain flour
1 litre * fish stock [rid:10497]
1kg cod, gemfish or any firm white fish fillet, cut in chunks
500ml cream or milk, hot
2 tablespoons butter
salt and freshly ground white pepper
2 tablespoons parsley, chopped

Method

  1. Cook pork or bacon very gently in a heavy saucepan, until fat has melted and meat is brown. Remove and reserve pork or bacon. Add onions to fat in pan and cook over low heat until golden. Stir in potatoes and flour, and toss until coated. Add fish stock and cook about 10 minutes.
  2. Add fish chunks and simmer, partially covered, for about 10 minutes or until fish is tender. Stir in hot, but not boiling, cream or milk and heat very slowly, without boiling. Add pork or bacon and butter, then season with salt and pepper and stir in parsley.

Note

  • Use head and bones from filleted fish to make stock. A good brand of packaged fish soup may be used in place of the home-made stock.

Variations

  • Manhattan clam chowder: Make as for old-fashioned fish chowder, substituting 300 g chopped clams (tinned do very well) for the fish and 750 g cooked or tinned tomatoes for the fish stock. Add also 80 g diced green pepper with the potato.

    New England clam chowder: Make as for old-fashioned fish chowder, substituting 300 g chopped clams (tinned or fresh) for the fish.
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