Butter

Butter

By
From
Encyclopedia of Food and Cookery

The delicate flavour and enriching qualities of butter are important to the cooking of many nations. It is used as a spread, as a dressing, as a cooking medium and as an ingredient in a great range of recipes from sauces to cakes. Butter should be stored in the refrigerator, in its original protective wrapping or container, or in a covered container kept especially for it. Butter may also be stored in the freezer for up to 6 months, with a moisture-proof wrapping over the original wrapping.

Salted or unsalted butter: Salting improves the keeping quality of butter. It is a matter of preference which to use as a spread, but be sure to use unsalted butter if it is specified in a recipe – the flavour of some Continental cakes and biscuits depends on it, and some foods are less inclined to stick if fried in unsalted rather than salted butter.

Cultured butter is made from a special culture (as with cheese), each make having its own distinctive culture and flavour.

Clarified butter has had the water and non-fat solids removed. It is sold as ghee (its name in Indian and other Asian cooking where it is extensively used), or you can make it yourself.

Ghee: Cut salted or unsalted butter into pieces, melt and heat slowly, without browning. Remove from heat and allow to stand for a few minutes: a milky residue will sink to the bottom and the clear yellow liquid above it is the clarified butter. Pour off the butter and allow to solidify. The residue may be added to soups or sauces to enrich them.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
see method for ingredients

Method

  1. Maître d’Hôtel butter: Cream 125 g butter with 2 tablespoons finely chopped parsley, freshly ground white pepper and 1 tablespoon lemon juice, beaten in little by little. Add salt to taste, form into a roll about 2.5 cm in diameter, wrap in plastic wrap and chill until firm. Serve in slices on grilled steak, chops, liver and fish.
  2. Mustard butter: Cream 125 g butter with 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard and 1 tablespoon finely chopped parsley. Add salt and freshly ground white pepper to taste. Use as a spread for ham or roast beef sandwiches or canapés, or form into a chilled roll as for Maître d’Hôtel butter and serve on grilled or fried steak, grilled kidneys or liver.
  3. Tarragon butter: Cream 125 g butter with 2 tablespoons chopped fresh tarragon, or 2 teaspoons dried tarragon chopped with 2 tablespoons parsley. Beat in 1 tablespoon lemon juice, little by little, and add salt and freshly ground white pepper to taste. Use as a spread for chicken sandwiches or canapés, or form into a chilled roll as for Maître d’Hôtel butter and serve on grilled or roast chicken or grilled fish.
  4. Marchand de Vin butter: Boil 80 ml red wine and 80 ml beef stock with 2 tablespoons chopped shallots and freshly ground black pepper until reduced to about 2 tablespoons. Cool. Cream 125 g butter and, little by little, beat in wine mixture. Add 1 tablespoon chopped parsley and salt and pepper to taste. Form into a chilled roll as for Maître d’Hôtel butter and serve on steak, hamburgers or calf’s liver, or stir into gravies, casseroles and pan sauces to enrich them.
Tags:
Back to top
    No results found
    No more results
      No results found
      No more results
        No results found
        No more results
          No results found
          No more results
            No results found
            No more results
              No results found
              No more results
              Please start typing to begin your search
              We're sorry but we had trouble running your search. Please try again