Bay

Bay

By
From
Encyclopedia of Food and Cookery

No kitchen should be without bay leaves, which come from the sweet bay or laurel tree. (Do not confuse with varieties of laurel which are poisonous.) If you have a bay tree, use the leaves 3–4 days after picking. To dry them for later use, cut a small twig or branch and hang it for a week or two in a cool, dry place, then store in an airtight jar.

In a supermarket the leaves are usually sold in packets, but try to avoid the very old, dried, brownish leaves, which have little flavour. Use bay leaves sparingly for best results.

Ways to use bay leaves:

–Place a leaf on top of terrines and meat loaves.

–When making kebabs, secure small pieces of bay between cubes of meat.

–Add a small leaf to the liquid when cooking ham, tongue, corned beef or other boiled meats.

–Always remember to add a small bay leaf to the bouquet garni which is used to flavour marinades, stocks, court bouillon, pickles and many other dishes.

–Add a piece of bay leaf when cooking eggplant, cauliflower, carrots, beetroot, tomatoes or onion.

–Transform sauces, sweet custards and rice puddings by infusing a small bay leaf in the milk.

–Add a bay leaf to vegetable and fish soups.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
see method for ingredients

Method

Tags:
Back to top
    No results found
    No more results
      No results found
      No more results
        No results found
        No more results
          No results found
          No more results
            No results found
            No more results
              No results found
              No more results
              Please start typing to begin your search
              We're sorry but we had trouble running your search. Please try again