Batter

Batter

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From
Encyclopedia of Food and Cookery

This is flour and liquid, and usually eggs and other ingredients, that are mixed to a consistency that can be stirred or ‘battered’. Batters are used for crêpes, pancakes and fritters, waffles and doughnuts, for coating foods for frying, for making Yorkshire pudding and baked desserts, and sometimes for making small, crisp cases to hold a filling, in the same way as pastry cases. In the US, the word is also used for cake mixtures, although they may be thicker than the batter used for other foods.

Depending on the purpose of the batter, ingredients and consistency vary. A batter for crêpes contains a high proportion of eggs and milk to flour, and should be the consistency of pouring cream. Coating batters for fish, etc., are often thicker, and may contain beer or soda water for extra lightness and crispness (the gases have this lightening effect). Whisked egg white is also added to some batters to give lightness. Yeast batters are also used for particular recipes (see: Blini).

Recipes often advise to rest the batter for anything from 20 minutes to 3–4 hours. During this time the starch cells swell and are more easily broken down in cooking, giving better flavour and texture. Batter may thicken while resting, and more liquid may have to be added to bring it back to the right consistency.

Before dipping foods in batter be sure they are dry or the batter will not cling.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
see method for ingredients

Method

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