Staples and how-tos

Staples and how-tos

By
Izy Hossack
Contains
11 recipes
Published by
Hardie Grant Books
ISBN
9781742707709
Photographer
Izy Hossack

These are the basic recipes that I use all the time. They’re simple, easy and totally customisable. If you’ve got a good base of solid recipes to rely on like these, you can create endless variations of them. Pastry and bread doughs are some of the most obvious, but things like nut butters, pesto and ganache are also very simple but powerful recipes that you can manipulate. They are (sometimes quite literally) the ‘bread and butter’ of recipes.

How to line a pie dish with pastry

Lightly flour a large piece of baking parchment. Place the pastry on it and flour that too.

Use a rolling pin to gently roll out the pastry, starting from the centre of the pastry and pushing out towards the edge. Rotate the parchment so you can turn the pastry easily and work your way around it, rolling in all directions so you end up with a circle (well, a circle as far as possible).

Keep rolling until it is larger than your pie dish.

Lightly flour the pastry and rolling pin, then roll the pastry up onto the rolling pin.

Unroll the pastry onto the pie dish.

Use your fingers to gently lift and push the pastry into the dish. You can use a little ball of excess pastry to help you push it in if you need to.

Fold up the edge and pinch to make a rim. I like to leave a bit of an overhang of pastry, as it will shrink slightly as it bakes.

For a decorative crust, pinch the dough between your thumb and bent forefinger at a 45-degree angle, all the way around the rim.

Once lined, it’s best to chill the pastry for 30 minutes before blind baking so that the gluten can relax. This will prevent the crust from shrinking too much when it bakes.

How to line, grease and flour cake tins

Cut a square of baking parchment a little bigger than the size of your cake tin.

Fold the parchment square in half to form a rectangle.

Fold it in half again to form a small square.

Then fold in half one last time to form a triangle.

Place the triangle on the base of the upturned cake tin. Position it so that the thinnest, longest point is in the centre of the tin.

Trim it using the edge of the tin as a guide.

Unfold the baking parchment. It should fit the cake tin perfectly.

Grease the edge and base of the cake tin using a folded piece of kitchen paper and some softened butter, coconut oil, margarine or shortening. Alternatively, using a pastry brush or spray, grease with vegetable oil.

Smooth the circle of baking parchment into the cake tin.

Grease the baking parchment circle as you did the cake tin.

Sprinkle in a small amount of flour.

Tilt, turn and tap the tin to coat the edge and base with flour.

Tap on a work surface and pour out any excess flour into the bin.

Featured Recipes in this Chapter

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