Tiny rose and violet creams

Tiny rose and violet creams

By
From
The Birthday Cake Book
Makes
60
Photographer
Laura Edwards

Reminiscent of lace gloves and nosegays from a more genteel era, and perfect served at the end of a special celebratory meal, or with afternoon tea. If you choose not to buy the violet liqueur, just make the rose cakes (you will need to double the quantities of rose fondant). Remember that different types of rose water and violet liqueur vary hugely in strength, so add little by little to taste.

For the cakes

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
100g unsalted butter, softened, plus more for the tin
60g self-raising flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
100g 70% cocoa solids chocolate, finely chopped
80ml whole milk
120g dark muscovado sugar
2 eggs, lightly beaten
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
40g ground almonds

To fill and decorate

Quantity Ingredient
500 g bag fondant powder
pink food colour paste
4-5 teaspoon rose water
white icing sugar, if necessary
4-5 teaspoons violet liqueur
grape violet food colour paste
400g 70% cocoa solids chocolate, roughly chopped
30 crystallised rose petals
30 crystallised violet petals

Special equipment

Quantity Ingredient
3 cm round cutter

Method

  1. Preheat the oven to 170°C/fan 160°C. Butter a 20 cm square cake tin and line the base with baking parchment. Sift the flour and baking powder together.
  2. Place the chocolate in a bowl. Bring the milk to a boil and pour it over. Stir until the chocolate has melted, then cool to blood temperature.
  3. Cream the butter and sugar together for a couple of minutes, then slowly beat in the eggs and vanilla extract, adding 1 tablespoon flour to prevent curdling. Slowly add the cooled chocolate mixture, then fold in the sifted flour mixture and ground almonds.
  4. Pour into the prepared tin and bake for about 25 minutes, or until a skewer emerges clean. Remove from the oven and leave to cool in the tin for a few minutes, then turn out on to a wire rack until cold. Place in the freezer for 30 minutes to firm up, so it will be easier to cut.
  5. Divide the fondant between two bowls. To one, add a pinprick of pink food colour, and rose water to taste, to form a stiff dough. If it is too runny, knead in a little white icing sugar. The fondants need to be quite strong in flavour. Repeat with the other bowl, adding the violet liqueur and food colour until you have a stiff dough.
  6. Split the cake in half horizontally and, using the cutter, cut 30 rounds from one layer of cake and 30 rounds from the other.
  7. Lay the little circles of cake out on to a tray and divide the fondant equally between them: 30 balls of rose and 30 balls of violet. Chill in the fridge for one hour until the fondant has hardened. Meanwhile, melt the chocolate by placing it in a bowl over gently simmering water, making sure the bowl does not touch the water.
  8. Lay out all the cakes on two wire racks (one flavour on each tray) with a sheet of baking parchment under each to catch the drips. Spoon over the chocolate, re-using any that drips through the racks. Decorate each cake with a crystallised rose or violet, as appropriate. They will keep for several days.
Tags:
Baking
Cakes
Birthday
cake
sweets
dessert
sweet
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