Classic seville orange marmalade

Classic seville orange marmalade

By
From
Citrus
Makes
10 x 450g jars
Photographer
Mowie Kay

Seville orange marmalade is the marmalade I make without fail every year, but I do it in small batches, partly because I do like to vary texture and flavour, but also because Seville oranges are so versatile it is a shame to limit their use.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
500g seville oranges
1.2 litres water
1 lemon, juiced
1kg preserving or granulated sugar

Method

  1. Cut the oranges in half and juice them. Scrape out all the membranes and any remaining pulp, leaving the orange shells with a clean layer of white pith still attached to the zest. Place the membranes on a large piece of muslin with any pips and tie into a bag. Put in a large bowl along with the juice.
  2. Cut the orange skins into quarters and slice as thinly as you can – this is most easily done with a very sharp serrated knife. Add these to the bowl containing the muslin bag and juice. Add the water and leave to stand overnight.
  3. When you are ready to make your marmalade, transfer the contents of the bowl to a preserving pan or large saucepan. Bring to the boil, then turn down to a steady simmer and cook until the orange peel is soft – this can take up to 1½ hours. When the peel is soft enough (you should be able to break a piece in two just by squeezing it lightly between your fingers) add the lemon juice and sugar.
  4. Return to the boil and keep it at a rolling boil until setting point is reached. This will take anything from 20–30 minutes, but start testing after around 15, either by the wrinkle test or with a thermometer – I usually take a belts-and-braces approach and do both. When setting point has been reached, take off the heat and leave to stand for around 15 minutes, then give it a good stir to make sure the peel is evenly distributed. Transfer to sterilised jars and seal. I will usually add a few drops of Amaretto or almond extract to one or two jars, just for variety.

Tips

  • If you want to pressure cook the orange peel to save time, you can do so – use half the amount of water and cook at high pressure for 10 minutes, then fast release. You should find that the peel will be perfectly soft. The resulting marmalade will not be quite as clear, but this really doesn’t matter if you aren’t making marmalade for competitive purposes!

    It’s useful to have a jar of marmalade to hand, and not just for toast and desserts. It is very good stirred into casseroles or gravy – especially with duck or pork. You can even use it in salad dressings: try whisking it into a simple olive oil and white wine vinegar vinaigrette with a tiny bit of honey and some mustard.
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