Blackberry, orange and orange blossom clafoutis

Blackberry, orange and orange blossom clafoutis

By
From
Citrus
Serves
4-6
Photographer
Mowie Kay

Two of my favourite aromas – blackberries cooking and orange blossom – make this quite a blissful dessert for me. If you can get Mandarine Napoléon, please use it instead of an orange liqueur as it is so, so much nicer.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient

For the baking dish

Quantity Ingredient
30g butter, softened
2 teaspoons dried orange zest, ground to a powder, see recipe note
2 tablespoons demerara sugar

For the blackberries

Quantity Ingredient
300g blackberries
2 tablespoons caster sugar
2 tablespoons creme de mure

For the batter

Quantity Ingredient
50g plain flour
50g caster sugar
A pinch salt
200ml whole milk, plus 1 tablespoon
50ml single cream
30g butter, melted
1 teaspoon finely grated orange zest
1/2 orange, juiced
1 teaspoon orange blossom water
2 teaspoon grand marnier, or ideally Mandarine Napoleon, (optional)
2 eggs

To serve

Quantity Ingredient
1 tablespoon icing sugar
1 teaspoon dried orange zest, ground to a powder
pouring cream

Method

  1. Put the blackberries in a bowl and sprinkle over the sugar and crème de mûre. Leave to stand for an hour.
  2. Preheat the oven to 180°C. Spread the butter over the base of a shallow ovenproof dish (between 21 and 23cm diameter). Mix the orange zest and demerara sugar together and sprinkle this over the butter. Make sure the dish is evenly covered.
  3. Put the flour in a mixing bowl with the caster (superfine) sugar and salt. Give a quick whisk to get rid of any lumps. In a separate bowl, mix together the milk, cream, melted butter, orange zest and juice, orange blossom water and liqueur, if using. Make a well in the middle of the flour and sugar, then break in the eggs. Using a whisk, work in the flour, incorporating from the edge of the well, until you have a thick paste, then gradually incorporate the wet ingredients. (You can instead put everything in a food processor and blend.)
  4. Spoon the blackberries into the prepared dish, straining them a little as you go, and making sure they are evenly spread. Pour over the batter and bake in the oven for around 25–30 minutes until slightly puffed up and a light golden brown – it should still be slightly wobbly in the middle.
  5. Mix the icing (confectioners’) sugar and orange zest together. Let the clafoutis cool a little, then sprinkle over the sugar and zest mixture. Serve with pouring cream.

Drying zest

  • The most versatile type of dried citrus is the zest. It is best to peel it away from the skin in wide strips and scrape off any remaining pith. This is what I use to add a gentle perfume and flavour to dishes such as a classic French fish soup or a beef casserole. Microplaned zest dries very quickly and is best fiinely ground to a powder in a pestle and mortar, then added either right at the beginning of a dish, by way of a rub, or right at the end, as a seasoning, in the same way you might use pepper, sumac, or even fennel pollen.
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