Peking duck stock

Peking duck stock

By
From
Meat
Makes
2 litres
Photographer
Dean Cambray

Like many people, I love Peking duck, and this recipe is a great way to make an expensive treat go a long way. Not only do you get a great meal from the duck itself (enjoyed with all the traditional accompaniments, of course), but if you turn the carcass into a stock, you can add that authentic flavour to all sorts of Asian soups and noodle dishes – I’ve even used it to make a shiitake mushroom and duck risotto.

Buy a roast Peking duck from Chinatown, and ask for the cavity juices to be put in a separate container for you.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
1 roast peking duck carcass
5 spring onions, roughly chopped
2 tablespoons ginger, chopped
2 sticks celery, roughly chopped
6 garlic cloves, chopped
1/4 cup light soy sauce
3 tablespoons hoisin sauce
1/4 cup ketjap manis
2 tablespoons plum sauce
1 stalk lemongrass, bruised with the back of a knife
1 long red chilli, seeded
2 limes, juiced
1 cup fresh coriander leaves, (keep the stalks and roots for the stock)
the juices and aromatics from the duck’s cavity (star anise, ginger, garlic etc)

Method

  1. Put the duck in a stockpot or heavy-based saucepan and pour on enough cold water to cover. Bring to the boil slowly. Use a ladle to skim away the foam or other impurities that rise to the surface. When the stock boils, lower the heat and add all the remaining ingredients, except for the lime juice and coriander leaves (but do add the coriander stalks and roots). Simmer very gently for 1½ hours, skimming away any foam from time to time. Top up with more cold water as necessary; the duck should always be covered with water.
  2. Remove the pan from the heat and throw in the coriander leaves. Leave it to sit for 20 minutes or so to allow the sediment to settle and to freshen the flavour.
  3. Once the stock has cooled down a bit, there are two ways to strain it. For a more rustic style, simply pour it through a fine sieve into a jug of bowl. For a clearer, more refined stock, or if you’re making clear broths or consommés, carefully ladle the stock out of the pot into a fine sieve. Leave to cool completely, then divide into batches and refrigerate or freeze. It keeps well in the fridge for up to 4 days and in the freezer for up to 3 months.
Tags:
Meat
Adrian
Richardson
La
Luna
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