Shoulder of pork roasted with fragrant spices

Shoulder of pork roasted with fragrant spices

By
From
Meat
Serves
8
Photographer
Dean Cambray

Pork shoulder is often overlooked in favour of the leg or loin, because it is interlarded with fatty connective tissue. Of course this makes it very tasty, as well as perfect for long, slow roasting or braising. You’ll usually find pork shoulder already boned, and sometimes rolled. I like to open the meat out and rub it inside with a fragrant paste of herbs, spices, garlic and salt. You can stick it in the oven to roast straight away, however I prefer to leave it to marinate overnight, so the flavours really permeate the meat. I use the blade part of the shoulder and ask my butcher to make sure the flap of skin is left attached, so I can use it to wrap around the meat.

Fragrant spice paste

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon fennel seed
1 tablespoon caraway seed
1 tablespoon cumin seed
1 tablespoon salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
4 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
1 lemon, juiced
1/4 cup coriander leaves, chopped
2kg rolled pork shoulder
olive oil
salt

Method

  1. To make the fragrant herb paste, combine all the ingredients in a mixing bowl and stir well.
  2. Unroll the pork shoulder and lay it out flat on your work surface with the skin-side facing up. Use a very sharp knife to score the surface in parallel lines, about 1 cm apart. Turn the meat over and make incisions all over the surface of the meat. Rub the paste into the meat, working it into the incisions thoroughly. Roll the shoulder up again and tie securely with string at 5 cm intervals. Transfer to the refrigerator and leave to marinate overnight, uncovered.
  3. When ready to cook, preheat the oven to 220ºC.
  4. Rub the pork skin with oil then season with salt. Place the pork on a rack inside a large roasting tin. Roast for 20 minutes then lower the oven temperature to 175ºC. Roast for a further 1 hour and 20 minutes, or until cooked. If you are using a meat thermometer, the pork is cooked when the internal core temperature reaches 72ºC.
  5. Transfer the cooked pork to a hot dish and leave it to rest for 20 minutes in a warm spot before removing the string and carving.
Tags:
Meat
Adrian
Richardson
La
Luna
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